“A Monoblogue after Binge Sleeping by the One Who is Now Awake and Back”

Diablogue #20

"Christina and Ken overlooking the Bow river near the ancient Medicine Wheel Indigenous sacred site near Majorville in central Alberta."
Christina and Ken overlooking the Bow river near the ancient Medicine Wheel Indigenous sacred site near Majorville in central Alberta.

Helpful Hint: Pay heed to what your mind, body, soul and spirit are telling you. They know best what you need to keep you healthy and therefore happy. If they are telling you to binge sleep, for example, give in you will see and reap the benefits. Too often we ignore what our four aspects are telling us, thereby becoming exhausted, sick or both.

 

So, allow me (too) monoblogue:

First of all I would like to thank all of our blog viewers, visitors, and followers during my and Christina’s slips and misses in our blogging. Christina and I view this as our responsibility to possibly assist others. When we miss our commitment to this diablogue, it deeply disappoints both of us.

I would also like to thank Christina for understanding picking up the slack while I was down. I am fortunate to have a wife, friend, and partner like her. I believe that she is one in a trillion.

She is unconditionally supportive, curious, and smart. She should not underestimate herself or how essential she is to this diablogue. Christina arguably has and is performing at least half if not more of the research into autism. Christina is also responsible for at least half again, if not more, of the ideas, insights, information and work-arounds we discuss and implement. I do not believe that I could successfully or happily do life or the diablogue without her.

It was Christina who had the idea to seek out a diagnosis, and thank God that she did. Also she is the editor of the blog, taking my disjointed and disorganized thoughts and words and cobbling them into something that is understandable to autistics and non-autistics alike. Trust me when I say that this is no easy task. If you do not believe me, just ask her.

Last post Christina said, “And so tonight, Sunday, as Ken binge sleeps on, I’ll post this and he’ll read it when he awakes sometime Monday. I hope he approves of my ramblings!” Ramblings? Hardly. I believe Christina is incapable of rambling. She always has something of value to add. I too learned from her monoblogue.

For example, from her previous post, I learned about the natural pruning process in the non-autistic brain as opposed to the lack of pruning processes in the autistic brain. Please refer back to the images and descriptions in the previous post.

Also, I learned about how the autistic brain had received the same social stimulation as the non-autistic brain, but unlike the orderly firing of the latter, it “lit up like a Christmas tree.” Also, I read her comment about how some researchers dub autistic brains as “chatterbox brains” and “noisy brains.” As a refresher, please refer back to the images and descriptions in the previous post.

It has been stated that multi-tasking is extremely challenging, if not impossible, for autistics to perform. I think I now better understand why and how based on the information presented in Christina’s monoblogue.

I now theorize that quite the opposite is true—in fact we hyper-multi-task, leading to overload. The chatterbox brains and/or noisy brain description is quite apt. I now think because of the more abundant synapses at each spine and the extra wiring— not all of which is connected like the non-autistic brain—in fact contribute to what I call a hyper-multi-tasking brain. However, because of the lack of synapse pruning we have shortfalls in the filtering and executive functioning processes of the non-autistic brain.

I think our brains literally try to process everything simultaneously, leading to what I call hyper multi-tasking runaway. That now explains the pain, confusion, debilitation, and exhaustion that I feel. After prolong exposure of pain, confusion, debilitation, and exhaustion I will become overwhelmed and overloaded thus eventually and inevitably this will induce the inescapable unavoidable binge sleeps that Christina mentioned.

Christina, see what you have done for me here? You have provided information that I previously was unaware of. Christina, you are an indispensible partner. I know I do not tell you nearly enough. You are the essential other half of my whole. Thank you.

Christina you can speak for me anytime. I only hope that I am equal to the task when you are unable to diablogue with me.

That being said, back to what we both want and like and what I believe we do the best, and that is our diablogue. Next time we will both write, as usual.

~Ken (Binge slept like a baby, thank you and love you Christina)

Next post #21 ~ To be determined!

 

 

2 thoughts on ““A Monoblogue after Binge Sleeping by the One Who is Now Awake and Back”

  1. As I read this post, I am just on the edge of cyring. This exchange is so touching and so informative. It is not just about what is or is not autism. It is also about daring to use your own courage to expose what you consider to be weaknesses in a very beautifully sensitive way. Thank you both for contributing to what it means to be uniquely human and to what it means to care about one another.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I am thinking about your comment about hyper-multi-tasking, which I too experience in my bi-polar kind of mind. I am re-reading the “executive function” diablogue where you say: “Ken: One of the definitions of multitasking is prioritization. For example, to me, each receives equal importance. None are higher than the others. The most important task is the one I am looking at that moment. If somebody introduces another task, it’s a like a Lazy Susan, the new task becomes the priority. If you do this again, it repeats. That for me, and for other Aspies, is where we have trouble with prioritisation.” This is very similar to my functioning, although I seem to be practically addicted to purposefully allowing another task to take priority so I seldom really finish a task. However, if the task is for someone else, e.g. a paid job, then I suppose my perfectionism means I feel I have never finished the task, even when I have to go on to something else. Perhaps, Ken, it is a blessing that you relate so well to working in an area where you can know when the task is finished and you are confident you have the skills to do it well. In the field of social work and education I have mostly been in, the task is not so clear-cut. But even as I reflect here, I am seeing that finding tasks that are clear cut would go far to salving the restlessness I struggle with as an unemployable disabled senior! Thanks!

    I also find that having an on-going stressor that cannot be addressed in any immediate time frame seems to shrink that “box” of available brain capacity before needijng to just “crash and reboot”. I wonder, Ken ,if this is true for yourself as well. (I do not need to binge sleep, but I do find other ways to accomplish the same thing, like reading easy novels and walking nowhere lots for however many days, minimally interacting with others, In fact, I have trouble sleeping at all when I am in over-stimulation mode.)

    Again, thanks for what you are doing here, especially the interplay that is so loving and bold!

    Liked by 1 person

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